Dentist Allentown, PA
George F. Carr, D.M.D.
1259 South Cedar Crest Blvd.
Allentown, PA 18103

610-776-7760

TREATMENT
 Braces (Orthodontia)
 Sealants
 Missing Teeth
 Bridges
 Crowns
 Root Canal Therapy
 Extractions
 Flap Surgery
 Dentures
 Jaw/TMJ
 Maxillofacial Surgery
 Cosmetic Dentistry
 Snoring and Sleep Apnea

You are in Treatment >
Crowns
Crowns
Crowns are synthetic caps, usually made of a material like porcelain, placed on the top of a tooth.

Crowns are typically used to restore a tooth's function and appearance following a restorative procedure such as a root canal. When decay in a tooth has become so advanced that large portions of the tooth must be removed, crowns are often used to restore the tooth.

Crowns are also used to attach bridges, cover implants, prevent a cracked tooth from becoming worse, or an existing filling is in jeopardy of becoming loose or dislocated. Crowns also serve an aesthetic use, and are applied when a discolored or stained tooth needs to be restored to its natural appearance.

Procedures*

A tooth must usually be reduced in size to accommodate a crown. A cast is made of the existing tooth or implant abutment and an impression is made. The impression is sent to a special lab, which manufactures a custom-designed implant abutment crown or a crown for your tooth. In some cases, a temporary crown is applied until the permanent crown is ready. Permanent crowns are cemented in place. Implant crowns are temporary cemented to the implant abutment.

Crowns are sometimes confused with veneers, but they are quite different. Veneers are typically applied only to relatively small areas.

Caring For Your Crowns

With proper care, a good quality crown could last up to eight years or longer. It is very important to floss in the area of the crown to avoid excess plaque or collection of debris around the restoration.

Certain behaviors such as jaw clenching or bruxism (teeth grinding) significantly shorten the life of a crown. Moreover, eating brittle foods, ice or hard candy can compromise the adhesion of the crown, or even damage the crown.

When a crown is attached to an implant it needs to be placed on an implant abutment. An implant abutment replaces the tooth structure that the dentist would prepare for a future crown.